Moms on Fire

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    Moms on Fire

    Directed by

    Sweden

    2016

    15 min

    • Swedish

    Animation, Short

    A film about defying and stretching the generally accepted standards of good motherhood.

    Awards

    • Startsladden Audience Prize - Göteborg FF
    • Teddy Award for Best Short Film - Berlinale Shorts
    • Jury Distinction, Festivals Connexion Jury Distinction - Annecy IAFF

    Festivals

    Credits

    Screenplay
    Joanna Rytel

    Director's Statement

    The performance is a sort of landscape of the pregnancy where I will ascribe the pregnant body a freedom and sexuality. Pregnant women are everywhere, in the city and on the countryside in all ranks of society and within all professions. The performance is interactive and will take place without announcement. I am provoked by the small margin you are given with motherhood and by a certain prevailing role that is ascribed as a mother to be. As a pregnant you are always examined in the public space. It becomes a part of your life. You are expected to be calm, content, normal, motherly, considerate, faithful, healthy, proper, asexual etc.

    Production
    ALTOFILM AB
    Distributor
    SWEDISH FILM INSTITUTE
    Joanna Rytel

    Joanna Rytel

    Sweden

    Joanna Rytel graduated in 2004 from the University College of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm. She has developed a complex artistry, which always points out our time's most poignant issues of gender, power and identity. She approaches these issues with great integrity, putting the personal at stake, making her form of address accessible to those outside the usual art and film worlds. Some of the controversial topics she explores are honor, racism, feminism, relationships between animals and people, taboos and sexuality in the public sphere, abortion and porn. Considering how loaded these topics are, one might guess that Rytel would handle them with political correctness. Far from it. The politically correct answers are left out, and the reaction becomes stronger when viewers are deprived of their passive role and become a part of the answer.