Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow

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    Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow

    Directed by

    Australia

    2017

    24 min

    • English

    Drama

    A complex drama set in the world of a professional theatre company, TOMORROW, AND TOMORROW, AND TOMORROW follows Lizzie, a working theatre actor playing Lady Macduff in a bold and visceral production of Shakespeare's Macbeth. When the play's internationally successful director, Helmut, pushes the cast beyond their limits, Lizzie is thrown into a dark and unacceptable world of onstage violence and brutality, causing her to question a life of commitment and sacrifice to her calling. A compelling, unsettling and triumphant examination of what it means to be a woman in a world that celebrates male genius.

    Awards

    • Best Masters Narrative Production - Victorian College of the Arts Graduate Awards

    Festivals

    Credits

    Cast
    Matilda Ridgway
    Mark Leonard Winter
    Charlotte Nicdao
    Screenplay
    Sunday Emerson Gullifer
    Cinematography
    Jack McAvoy
    Editing
    Andrew Kristiaman
    Music
    Kelly Ryall

    Director's Statement

    This is a film born from love and anger.

    I have always loved theatre, and Shakespeare in particular. I saw my first professional Shakespeare production at the age of 10. It was Joel Edgerton playing King Henry V, and I was hooked. Years later, I found myself working in marketing for Australia’s national Shakespeare company, Bell Shakespeare. It’s been a lifelong love.

    But late 2015, the theatre industry in Sydney was abuzz. Darlinghurst Theatre Company had released their 2016 season program and their stats were dire. Where were all the women? In response, a group of actors launched Women in Theatre & Screen (WITS). They held a series of public forums to ask: why does this still continue to be an issue? The first, a women-only event, had a turnout of 300 creative professionals.

    It was shocking. Women described verbal and physical abuse that had gone unchecked, discrimination and harassment—and this wasn’t just on the fringes. Sexism was insidious and it was rife, throughout mainstage companies and professional film and television productions. How was this still happening?

    A few months later, I caught up with my friend, Matilda Ridgway. She is an actor, and was coming off a six-month tour playing Ophelia in Bell Shakespeare’s production of Hamlet. For over 100 performances, she went mad. Because that’s what women do in Shakespeare’s plays: they get married, they are murdered, or they go mad.

    At the same time, the same conversations were being had in the Australian film and television industry. Where were all the women? Why were the numbers so bad? Women account for just 16% of feature film directors in Australia—funnily enough, only 16% of Shakespeare’s characters are women. On stage and behind the camera, things are not so different for Matilda and me.

    At the beginning of 2016, I moved to Melbourne where I had been accepted directly into second-year of the Victorian College of the Arts’ Master of Film and Television in Directing. I was one of three women in a class of 12. I thought about the way men are so often elevated as geniuses, while women have to prove themselves over and over again.

    I love theatre. I love film. I love what I do. But to quote Lizzie, “I don’t know why it has to be this hard”.

    This film is my call to arms.

    Production
    SUNDAY FILMS
    Sunday Emerson Gullifer

    Sunday Emerson Gullifer

    Australia

    Sunday Emerson Gullifer is an award-winning filmmaker and masters graduate of the prestigious Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne, Australia. Her short film, TOMORROW, AND TOMORROW, AND TOMORROW, had its world premiere at Sydney Film Festival in 2017 where it was Highly Commended in the Dendy Awards for Australian Short Films, and screened internationally at Telluride Film Festival. The film later premiered online as a Vimeo Staff Pick and was featured on Short of the Week. In 2018, Sunday was awarded the Lexus Australia Short Film Fellowship, presented by Sydney Film Festival. The $50,000 fellowship funded production of her latest short film, BROKEN LINE NORTH, and saw the film premiere at Sydney Film Festival in 2019.

    Selected Filmography